“Not Interested” is Interesting

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We heard a funny story from one of our MercurySays customers.

A new staff member arrived in the firm’s sales office. Fresh out of college, she made quite a name for herself almost immediately. She had been assigned to cold emails. She had been given a list of prospects on the CRM.

The boss was very old school. No fan of high tech, he had reluctantly introduced CRM a few years back. Even now, he claimed he barely used it.

For the rest of the busy morning on that day, the boss kept an eye on his “new girl” from his glassed-in office. Just before lunch, he saw her busily tapping away at the keyboard. He pulled up a chair beside her and said: “Any replies?”

“I only got one. They said they weren’t interested.”

She pulled up the email. The message was: “Sorry. Not interested. You are too expensive.”

“That’s a tough one. You have to reply to them immediately.”

“Yeah, I did that.” She scrolled down, and he read her email carefully. He was utterly astonished. Someone sitting nearby thought he would faint.

The boss’s “new girl” had written …

“Thanks for your message. I’m glad you noticed that our product is above the average price because it confirms that its quality is well above average, and you won’t be troubled by an inferior product. So, you and your firm will benefit in the longer term. It’s always good to meet someone who knows their own mind because it makes it easier to identify and solve problems, especially if you are open to new ideas.

Thanks again for your email. May I send you a brochure about our product? I am sure you will be pleased to see what it offers.”

The boss took a breath. “Did they come back to you?”

“Straight away. I’ve sent the brochure and asked if we could have a chat at 10 o’clock tomorrow. They agreed.”

The boss stuttered: “Have you done this before?”

“No. That’s the first one ever. But, I might need some help tomorrow morning.”

Then, the “new girl” showed the boss how she did it. He didn’t understand how MercurySays worked at first, but he had a sudden thought. He asked her to show it to his worst performing staff member (a guy who happened to be his nephew).

A few days later, the “new girl” hurried into the boss’s office to ask a question. He looked up, surprised by her sudden appearance. Out of the corner of her eye, she saw MercurySays was open on his screen.

She had pasted the “not interested” email into the window of MercurySays.

The words were: Sorry. Not interested. You are too expensive.

MercurySays responded like this.

First …

They are feeling emotional.

So, instantly say you know exactly how they feel about the issues under discussion.

Then …

They are moderately certain.

So, explain which aspects of their current position will create difficulties.

Then, confidently indicate that your approach will help to overcome hurdles and will provide ongoing support.

Next …

(She chose the most relevant option, which was the first.)

They are feeling unyielding.

So, say that holding firm is often a good start to solving problems.

Then, remind them that a totally inflexible or unrealistic approach often causes more problems to arise.

Now …

Ask for a “Yes.”

They are primed to make a positive decision so ask them to agree to the next step in your strategy.

This is why she replied the way she did.

“Thanks for your message. I’m glad (emotion) you noticed that our product is above the average price because it confirms (certainty) that its quality is well above average, and you won’t be troubled (emotion) by an inferior product. So, you and your firm will benefit in the longer term. It’s always good (emotion) to meet someone who knows their own mind (unyielding) because it makes it easier to identify and solve problems, especially if you are open to new ideas (unyielding).

Thanks again for your email. May I send you a brochure (next step in the strategy) about our product? I am sure (certainty) you will be pleased (emotion) to see what it offers.”

Remember, this was a “not interested” email from a prospect.